Fire and Water Damage Restoration, Mold Removal Services in Ouray, Colorado

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970-712-5298

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1-800 WATER DAMAGE of Western Colorado is the trusted name in restoration services for Ouray. Dealing with disasters such as flooding, fire, sewage, and more can be stressful. Often, these situations occur unexpectedly—do you know who to call if it happens to you? We have over a decade of industry-leading experience and our highly-trained professionals have the tools and knowledge necessary to get your property looking like new again.

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    Facts About Ouray

    Ouray is a Home Rule Municipality that is the county seat and the most populous city of Ouray County, Colorado, United States. The city population was 813 at the U.S. Census 2000 and 1,000 as of the U.S. Census 2010. The Ouray Post Office has the ZIP code 81427.

    HISTORY
    Originally established by miners chasing silver and gold in the surrounding mountains, the town at one time boasted more horses and mules than people. Prospectors arrived in the area in 1875. In 1877, William Weston and George Barber found the Gertrude and Una gold veins in Imogene Basin, six miles south southwest of Ouray. Thomas Walsh acquired the two veins and all the open ground nearby. In 1897 opened the Camp Bird Mine, adding a twenty-stamp mill in 1898, and a forty-stamp mill in 1899. The mine produced almost 200,000 ounces of gold by 1902, when Walsh sold out to Camp Bird, Ltd. By 1916, Camp Bird, Ltd., had produced over one million ounces of gold.

    At the height of the mining, Ouray had more than 30 active mines. The town—after changing its name and that of the county it was in several times—was incorporated on October 2, 1876, named after Chief Ouray of the Utes, a Native American tribe. By 1877 Ouray had grown to over 1,000 in population and was named county seat of the newly formed Ouray County on March 8, 1877.

    The Denver & Rio Grande Railway arrived in Ouray on December 21, 1887. It would stay until the automobile and trucks caused a decline in traffic. The last regularly scheduled passenger train was September 14, 1930. The line between Ouray and Ridgway was abandoned on March 21, 1953.

    In 1986, Bill Fries, a.k.a. C. W. McCall, was elected mayor, ultimately serving for six years.

    The entirety of Main Street is registered as a National Historic District with most of the buildings dating back to the late nineteenth century. The Beaumont Hotel and the Ouray City Hall and Walsh Library are listed on the National Register of Historic Places individually, while the Ouray County Courthouse, St. Elmo Hotel, St. Joseph’s Miners’ Hospital (currently housing the Ouray County Historical Society and Museum), Western Hotel, and Wright’s Opera House are included in the historic district.

    Discover the 1-800 WATER DAMAGE difference for yourself when you call 970-712-5298 for water damage and property restoration services in Ouray.

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